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Korat

Korat

Which Homes Are Best

Lifespan

Average Size

Breed Background

Breed Origin

Original Gene Pool

Breed Founder

Appearance

Description

Personality

Indoors or Outdoors

Noisiness

Interaction

Intelligence

Playfulness

Friendliness

Children

Other Animals

Breed Predisposed Ailments

Grooming

Brushing

Ears

Finances

Cost of Kittens

Pros & Cons

Pros

Cons

Height:
Weight:
Lifespan:
Colors:
Suitable For:
Temperament:

Final Thoughts

The Korat cat breed is widely famous for its magnificent blue coat and affectionate nature. They’re well known as ‘good luck cats’ in many households in Thailand.

Introduction

Korat cats are one of the most unique felines in the world because of their distinct blue-gray coat and friendly personality. The cat, also called Si-Sawat, has a heart-shaped face and is originated from ancient Thailand. 

It’s relatively smaller than most other popular cats, but if you’re a fan of a gentle, affectionate feline — Korat is the one for you.

It has a strong, sturdy build alongside a pair of expressive and beautiful amber/green eyes. Perhaps the most interesting thing about this breed is their lively expression. These cats are mostly found in the East Asian region, especially in Thai homes.  

Which Homes Are Best for Korat Cats?

Korat Cats are very social animals, hence they don’t thrive well in small, nuclear families. They’re at their best in multi-family homes, preferably with another Korat. Truth be told, Korats aren’t a fan of multi-pet homes as they don’t cooperate well with a lot of animals. 

However, their laid-back and social nature allows them to get along with dogs and other cat breeds, even though it might take some time. Korats should never be left alone for too long, as they might develop anxiety, depression, or even destructive behaviors in the process.

Lifespan 

The average Korats can live up to 15-19 years, depending on their living and dietary conditions. There have been examples of these cats living for more than 20 years, but they’re exceptions. 

Korats are naturally healthy cats and don’t get sick too often, but they’re prone to enzyme deficiency issues, which are mostly genetic.  

Average Size 

Korats are medium-sized cats, and they weigh around 6-10 pounds on average. They don’t have a particularly muscular physique, but they’re quite compact in size. Korats take time to mature and might take around 5 years to fully grow up both mentally and physically. 

Breed Origin

The name ‘Korat’ came from a province in Thailand. It used to be a traditional gift and was considered a symbol of good luck in Thai culture. As a matter of fact, Korat cats weren’t sold up until the 20th century — it was only given as a token of appreciation in Thailand.

Original Gene Pool 

Legends say that the Korat cats were first discovered in ancient times in a place called Ampur Pimai in Korat, Thailand. The earliest reference of Korats came in the Smud Khoi of Cats, a book produced back in the 14th century. 

The book had a total of 17 ‘good luck’ cats from Thailand, and Korats were a proud part of them. The name ‘Korat’ was given by the then king of Thailand, King Rama V. The common saying about these cats is that if they have kinks in their tails- Korats will bring their owner good luck.

Breed Founder 

Korat is a pure and ancient breed, and they were mostly found in Thailand up until the 20th century. The first pair of Korats were two siblings, Nara and Darra. 

They were imported into the US back on June 12, 1959, by Cedar Glen Cattery of Oregon. Both of the cats were born in the Mahajaya Cattery, Thailand. As of now, you can find a lot of Korat cats in the US, and all of them can be traced back to their root in Thailand.  

Appearance 

Everything about Korat cats gives a royal, elegant vibe. From the beautiful blue-silver fur to the dreamy, green eyes and beautiful heart-shaped head — Korats do look like angels in disguise! 

Description 

Korats do not have a blend of different colors in them. A regular-sized Korat cat has blue and silver-tipped fur, peridot green eyes, forward-facing and large ears, and a heart-shaped head. 

According to the CFA (Cat Fanciers’ Association), the fur gives the Korats a halo-type appearance. This medium-sized cat breed has a low amount of body fat. In some cases, the coats of Korats have grey/white markings, and they grow larger as the cat grows older.

This breed of cats is often called “Cat with five hearts’ as they have heart-shaped heads, noses, and chests. Their heads have this distinct, valentine’s heart-ish look both from the top and from the front. 

Personality 

Korat cats are street smart and very opinionated. They’re highly social animals and like to be close to the people in their households. They’ll give their heart to only a few specific people and would prefer to spend most of their time with them. But that doesn’t mean they’re not open to affection and adoration from others!

Indoors or Outdoors 

Korat is mainly a house cat, or a lap cat to be exact. They’re not a fan of outdoor hangouts and prefer to rule the household they’re in. As a matter of fact, a Korat cat likes to think that it’s in charge of the house and other pets, and humans are its subordinates!

Korats generally prefer the company of other Korats instead of dogs or other pets. However, they’re very affectionate towards human beings and are gentle with children.

Noisiness

Korat cats can be quite bold about what they like and dislike, but they’re quiet in general. They also prefer a very quiet environment. That being said, Korats can make different sounds like a scream or a chirp if he wants something from his owners. 

Interaction 

Korats are many things, but being a loner isn’t one of them. They follow the people around them religiously, asking for attention and affection. He’s very open to interacting with human beings and other animals but mostly prefers another Korat as a companion. 

This is another reason why they were given to people as pairs. Korats can’t live alone and may develop many mental issues like aggression, anxiety, and depression if left alone for too long.

Intelligence 

Even though Korats are quite gentle, they’re very playful, energetic, and intelligent to say the least. You can teach them many tricks or give them puzzle toys to solve. These cats love to be challenged and get elated if given rewards for solving puzzles.

Playfulness

Korat cats are highly energetic and love to play fetch, walk on a leash or simply run all around the house when they’re bored. They can be taught household rules quite easily by rewarding them with a treat or maybe a simple head pat!  

Friendliness

Korat Cats are quite friendly in nature and like to be around people, unlike many other breeds who prefer solitude most of the time. In fact, they can be really close to their household members and a bit clingy at times.

Children 

Cats are surprisingly playful around children in general, and Korats are no exception. This breed of cat is liked by children as they’re very gentle around them. Korats tend to entertain children by making expressions and different sounds.

Other Animals 

While it’s true that Korats always prefer another Korat to partner with in a household, they’re not hostile towards other pet animals. As a matter of fact, they’re quite friendly towards the likes of dogs or rabbits. 

Korat cats follow a hierarchy in the household, one where they’re on top — and as long as the other animals are fine with it, they won’t have any problems.  

Breed-Predisposed Ailments

Korats are one of the oldest breeds of cats, so it’s expected that they won’t have a lot of health issues. The cats might face issues like gangliosidosis on rare occasions, but it’s a very uncommon condition. 

They’re a bit sensitive to aesthesia though, so you need to contact a vet before applying such medicines on a Korat cat. 

  • GM1 Gangliosidosis
  • GM2 Gangliosidosis
  • Anesthesia sensitivity 
  • Neuromuscular Degenerative Disease

Grooming 

Korats have a low-shedding shimmery coat of fur, so you don’t really have to groom them a lot. Brushing them once or twice a week should be more than enough. 

Apart from that, you need to give their teeth and ear some attention, but it doesn’t have to be on a daily basis. And that’s as much grooming as this cat requires. 

Brushing 

The best thing about Korats is their glittering blue-silver coat, and keeping it shiny should be your first priority. You don’t really have to brush its coat a lot, just do it once a week, and that should be fine. 

A fine stroke of the brush on their furs should be enough, as they’re generally low-shedding. Apart from brushing, you also have to brush their teeth and trim their nails every once in a while.

Ears 

Cleaning a cat’s ears is crucial, be it a Persian or a Korat. Cats cannot clean their ear themselves, so often we can see that their ears are quite dirty. 

Whenever you feel that your Korat has dirty ears, simply wipe it out with a soft damp cloth or a cotton ball. If you use a piece of cloth, do moisten it with warm water and apple cider vinegar. Don’t use cotton swabs, they can be harmful to the cat.

Finances 

Let’s be honest, Korat cats aren’t the most affordable pets on the market. Compared with other cats like the Bengal or the Persian cats, they cost a lot. However, their maintenance cost isn’t too much as they have a low-shedding tendency and are quite healthy in general.  

Cost of Korat Cats

Depending on the location, Korat Cats can cost from $500 to $800. Kittens usually cost less while the adult cats go for a pretty high rate. The lack of availability is a reason behind its price, although they’re relatively cheaper in the outskirts of Thailand.

Cost of Food

If you want to provide quality food for your Korat, then you’ll have to spend at least $15-$20 per month. It depends on the size of our Korat as well, since kittens require less food while adults require more. 

Korats aren’t the largest of cats and they don’t have a huge appetite. However, they do require a basic amount of food, which can be provided via treats and cat foods. 

Pros & Cons 

Pros

  • Highly intelligent felines
  • Doesn’t require a lot of grooming
  • Very social animal, bonds with family members easily

Cons

  • Can’t live alone, might generate anxiety if left alone for too long
  • May seem a bit too clingy and demanding at times